Recharging Your Running Program

Whether you are currently a runner or you are thinking about getting into the sport as a fun spring activity to reach your health and cardiovascular goals, you may have to recharge your program and start slow and low to avoid injury or return to previous level of fitness.

Sometimes this can be hard to know where to start. One of the main objectives with setting up a return to running program is starting at a slow pace and building up your endurance to avoid injury and build your tolerance to increased activities. Many times we will want to push through
our pain because we believe that will get us to reach our goals quicker. A lot of times this can result in burn out and pain which can lead to dropping off your program all together.

It is important to find a realistic starting point in your fitness level and build up from there. Many times an interval training program is a good way to start. In this way you can build your cardio endurance and strength slowly with out feeling like you are pushing past your limits. The following link is a good resource to an example of an interval training program that can get you moving in the right direction. Many times it is smart to start slow, even at a brisk walk and build up your pace as your program progresses.

Return to Running Progression

Along with an interval program to slowly build up endurance and strength it is good to also strengthen the muscles surrounding the lower extremity joints and core to reduce stresses through these areas with over use. Here are a couple basic exercises to build both strength and flexibility.

-heel raises
-side laying hip abduction
-bridges
-lunges
-planks (forward/side)
-hamstring stretch
-quadriceps stretch
-piriformis stretch

It is also important to point out that cross training with other activities like yoga, cycling, and weight lifting is a good way to improve strength and health while also mixing up your program to avoid over use injuries. Also, don’t forget to add in a good warm up before jumping into your activities. Good blood flow and muscle extensibility before asking your muscles to preform strenuous tasks with help to reduce the chance of injury.

Lauren Rood, LPTA
Physical Therapist Assistant
Isanti Physical Therapy

May 30th, 2019

Posted In: General

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